rDigital News: Net neutrality, the ‘right to be forgotten,’ and more

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Photo credit: HackNY via Flickr

Much like space exploration, in many ways, the Internet is uncharted territory. The rules and those who enforce them are still being defined.

As it is now, the web is open and equal to all, but is this “net neutrality” beneficial or is it standing in the way of potential progress? More importantly, who decides and enforces the rules of the web?

This week’s news brought up issues of right and wrong on the Internet and what is being done to police the wild wild web. Find out more in this week’s edition of rDigital News:

The debate over net neutrality

As it stands, the Internet is currently free and open and in this digital realm, all websites are created equal. This is the basic concept of “net neutrality,” and the subject of heated debate this past week. News of Netflix working with Internet providers to access higher streaming speeds fuelled discussion over whether or not all websites truly deserve equal treatment.

For the pros, cons, and controversy, check out these links:

E.U. Privacy Ruling for Google History

The European Union Court of Justice determined early this week that Google users have “the right to be forgotten” online. The ruling meant that Google would be obligated to erase “irrelevant” or outdated data at the request of users. The result of this case was an onslaught of requests by users that ranged from an ex-politician seeking re-election to paedophiles, exercising this newly established right to privacy.

To learn more about the complexities of online privacy, check out our series with the Walrus:

Crack down on hackers

Finally, news at the end of this long weekend was dominated by stories exposing numerous hackers. According to a press release from the FBI, five military Chinese hackers were charged with computer hacking, economic espionage and other offences. The case is the result of an investigation into cyber spying on six Americans in the U.S. nuclear power, metals and solar products industries.

In addition to this case, the FBI cracked down on hackers worldwide linked to the malware known as Blackshades, which lets attackers access users’ personal information, hijack webcams and much more. The investigation resulted in more than 100 arrests of hackers from approximately a dozen countries.

For the latest tech news, views, and debates follow us on Twitter @rdigitaLIFE

 

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